Tag Archive | nuts

no meat for Misty

Misty has gone off meat.  Every time I create him some delicious little meaty treat like these these or these, he boos them.   He does enjoy dropping them from his tray down to Boosty though.  Doesn’t seem to give two hoots about feeding premium organic, free range beef to a dog for Pete’s sake.  All he wants are peas.  He will pick up each pea individually, oh so carefully examine,  then place it  in his mouth.  Suppose I should be glad he is so taken by the humble pea.
I’m not concerned, it’s not like Misty is fading away or anything.  Quite the opposite – Viper describes him as ‘nuggety.’  He’s becoming aware of different tastes, textures and combinations – and works out what he wants and what he doesn’t.  I suppose it’s just like any of us going through a food ‘stage’ – getting obsessed with a certain ingredient or flavour, and wanting to eat that all of the time.  Like my sweet potato fixation.
Any current favourite eats at the moment? Dishes? Ingredients? Combinations?
Anything with cheese or peas will be gobbled down by MIsty – this next recipe is an attempt to broaden his horizons.
Cashew Carrot Curry Cakes:
  • 1/4C breadcrumbs (I used millet bread but any bread is fine)
  • 1/2C vegetable puree (something starchy works best, I used carrot and sweet potato)
  • 1/4C pureed corn kernels
  • 3T brown rice flour
  • 1/4t curry powder
  • 1/8t aluminium free baking powder
  • 1/8C sesame seeds
  • 1/8C raw cashews
  • 1 egg (or 1 flax “egg”)
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/2t fresh or dried herbs (I used fresh chives and mint)
  1. Combine all ingredients in a medium sized bowl.
  2. Heat a fry pan with a little oil or butter.
  3. Drop teaspoons full of batter in, and cook for 2 minutes each side or until golden brown.
  4. Serve with a dollop of yoghurt, sour cream or mashed avacado.
Viper said that all they needed was a pinch of salt and they were adult-worthy.  High praise, high praise indeed.
Misty would like to say a big HAPPY BIRTHDAY to a certain HEABlet who is turning 1 year old today… he happens to have a little bit of an internet crush on her, and heard she was having a special Eric Carle birthday party.  He has cracked out his caterpillar in her honour.
He seems to find it quite appetizing.  Suppose caterpillar could be considered meat?
Congrats to the HEABies for getting through that first year.

no sugar no bake buckwheat na na bites

Another day, another sugar free recipe.
Cutting out sugar is no big deal for me; I don’t eat a lot of the refined stuff anyway – my sweetness tends to appear in the form of honey, agave, molasses or rice syrup.  For the next 10 days however, I will be relying on simply fruit for a bit of the sweet stuff.  My taste buds have been reprogrammed over a period of time to appreciate the sweetness that comes naturally from fruit, vegetables and whole grains (I sound like such a geek).  I do understand why people struggle so much with cutting back on sugar though – it is snuck into EVERYTHING these days, no wonder as a population we are addicted to the stuff.
Just don’t even think about asking me to give up salt.  That is one white powder that I AM addicted to.  Hey, a girl has gotta have a vice right?  Right?  I’m doing well on the sugar, let’s just focus on that.
Bananas are awesome.  Such a great baking “tool” – they add sweetness, moisture and nutrition to any creation.  I use them a lot to cut down on added sugar, butter or oil in recipes.  This recipe is ridiculously easy – it requires just mixing and freezing so I don’t want to hear any excuses.
Buckwheat na na Bites
(Wheat, gluten, soy, dairy, egg free.  Vegan.  They could be raw if you used sprouted, dehydrated buckwheat groats, raw almond meal or oats.  Just sayin’).
  • 1/2C almond meal
  • 1/4C roasted buckwheat groats, ground into flour (or sub in 1/4C oatmeal)
  • 1/4t sea salt
  • 1T ground flax
  • 1/2C raisins
  • 1/2t ground cinnamon
  • 1/3C pureed banana (basically 1 medium banana, mashed up)
  • 2t nut butter
  • 1t coconut oil

Combine first 7 ingredients and set aside for 10 minutes or so.

Add in nut butter and coconut oil (melted).  Mix well.

Roll teaspoons of dough into balls and then flatten with a fork.  Place on a lined baking tray.

Freeze.

The banana flavour comes through nice and strong which I love… having been without bananas for months due to Cyclone Yasi which devastated the banana crops of Queensland, I welcome back affordable bananas with open arms.  It got to the point that a single banana was costing around $3 earlier in the year, yeesh.

I’ve been here.  It wasn’t as big as I was expecting.  Disappointing.

Misty is also digging the addition of banana in his diet – he enjoys them cut into rounds with a dollop of almond butter, and a sprinkling of cinnamon.  These cookies are baby friendly, but they do contain nuts, so be aware of any sensitivities to these.  Tahini would work in the place of nut butter.  The raisins could also be a choking hazard for younger babies.  You can omit, or simply chop finely before adding to mix.

I think frozen raisins are my new favourite thing.  Little chewy nuggets of sweetie yum yum.  I won’t tell you what Viper said they looked like.  Stupid Viper.

Lord of the Bars

So, you’ve seen the movie.

I only remember the first one.  The other 2 are a bit of a sleepy daze… I think I fell into a sugar-induced coma after eating too many lollies.  I don’t really dig the fantasy genre.  Or science fiction.  Viper loves both.  We make it work; it can’t always be rose petals and sweet guitar serenades (particularly as he can only play 3 songs on the guitar, which he repeats and repeats and repeats, ah bless).

At least now, if someone has no idea about New Zealand, you can just say “Lord of the Rings,” and they will know what you are talking about.

The movie does look nice, but the real New Zealand is better:

Green is good.  Makes me happy.

I reckon this tree is older than Yoda.

Tiny man or huge rock?  You decide.

Way better than the movie.

According to Viper, to explore this wild and unspoilt land, you need much sustenance to fuel your intrepid journey.  He likens the satisfying power of this next recipe to that of “Hobbit-food” whatever that may be.   See the movie, now eat the bar.

Oaty Fruity Filler Bar:

My slightly more interesting version of these Friendly Fruit Bars – again, these would be very suitable for kiddies, just omit nuts if you are giving them to a baby/toddler (choking risk).

This recipe is kind of fool-proof.  You can make it how you like it.  Super fruity?  Blend extra fruit and have a nice thick fruit filling layer.  Like it a tad nutty?  Just add more nuts, it’s really that simple.  Don’t be afraid to play around – I would call myself an intuitive cook (just a fancy way of saying that I can’t stick to a recipe) Mistakes are good in the kitchen – it gives you the opportunity to work out a different flavour combination, method or technique.  Learn by DOING.

  • 1/2C dried fruit
  • 1C whole oats
  • 4T apple puree
  • 1T cinnamon (I’m crazy for the stuff, feel free to use less)
  • 1/4C walnuts
  • 1/2t sea salt
  • 1/2t baking powder
  • 1/2t vanilla extract (optional)
Chose your dried fruit.  I went with what I had on hand (no, really?) apricots, prunes, fig.  Admittedly, not the most attractive when blended (see evidence further down) but tasty nonetheless.
Blend
Scrape out blended fruit “paste” and set aside.
I always blend the fruit first, as you don’t need to be too picky cleaning out the food processor – any bits of fruit left will just be blended back in the the oats (mmm fruity oaty).
Pulse your oats, apple, cinnamon, salt, vanilla and baking powder in a food processor.  The finished texture is up to you; a few oats left a bit chunky is nice for texture.  You could blend 3/4C oats, and fold in 1/4 cup of whole oats if you want, that’s the beauty of it, play around.
Spread half of your oaty mix into a lined baking tray.  Push down firmly.  Spread over your fruit paste.
Sprinkle over nuts.
Spread over remaining oaty mix, push the whole lot down firmly.  As it is a pretty crumbly mixute, I just sprinkle over the rest of the oaty mix, and kind of squash it together.  It doesn’t matter if you have gaps or holes – this is not a fussy appearance-driven bar, it’s all about taste.  This is what I like to call “rustic” food (this was a trick used in the cafe I used to work at – if something wasn’t perfect looking, we would just call it “rustic” – covers a multitude of sins).
Bake at 180 degrees celcius for 12-15 minutes, depending on your oven.
This recipe was made in a 20cm by 10cm loaf pan.
I think Gollum is angry, ‘cos I won’t give him any of MY “precious” bars.  Ha.